Tulane architecture students tasked with saving historic courthouse

The building is of 1855 Greek Revival style, featuring distinctive features of columns and archways. | Contributed photo

The students of the Tulane School of Architecture's Master of Preservation Studies program have been assigned the task of deciding on a new use for the endangered Carrollton Courthouse.

"Carrollton Courthouse is a beloved landmark that deserves to have a special place in New Orleans’ future," one student of the program said.

The students have been working in the project alongside the LSU Reich School of Landscape Architecture, as well as the Louisiana Landmarks Society for the past five months in order to give new life to the courthouse that has been declared one of the 11 most endangered historic places in the country. The building is of 1855 Greek Revival style, featuring distinctive features of columns and archways.

The students are working under the supervision and instruction of John Stubbs and Michael Shoriak, the director of the program and the adjunct architecture professor, respectively.

"This is an urgent situation from the standpoint of saving this building," Stubbs said.

The building, which has been vacant for three years, will soon be put up for auction, making possible attempts at repurposing it time-sensitive. Among the suggested purposes is a museum with a public park.

Organizations in this story


Tulane University 6823 St Charles Ave New Orleans, LA 70118

Get notified the next time we write about Tulane University!