Brown University study reports low exercise levels in Brazil

This study indicated that approximately 29 percent of Brazilian men and 21 percent of women said they were active in their free time. | File photo

Brown University recently published a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association analyzing data that was gathered through the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health.

The survey of 10,500 adults who had no cardiovascular diseases. This study indicated that approximately 29 percent of men and 21 percent of women said they were active in their free time. The sample consisted of individuals between 35 and 74.

This study also notes that those that were physically active were found to be healthier, having lower risks for future cardiovascular diseases.

Study lead author and Ph.D. candidate at the Brown University School of Public Health Xiaochin Lin states that in the U.S., approximately 50 percent of those surveyed were physically active.

“We have a social gradient according to income and formal education,” collaborating author and University of São Paolo researcher Paulo Lotufo said. “Moreover, ELSA-Brasil assembles a racially admixed population with a mix of European, African and Amerindian ancestries.”

Lin also notes that while it is obvious that physical activity and exercise is tied with overall health, being able to measure it and having data on the extent to the benefits of it would be able to help policy makers in developing programs against obesity, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

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