Brown University researchers advance synthetic stem cell research

Brown researchers have developed synthetic cells that have been shown to be nearly as effective as mouse cells.
Brown researchers have developed synthetic cells that have been shown to be nearly as effective as mouse cells. | File photo

Brown University researchers have made progress in developing stem cells via a synthetic sample.

According to a report, stem cells that could help transplant patients can be generated by using mouse cells. However, the risk of contamination through this method makes it unsuitable for medically viable uses. 

In a study, Brown researchers have developed synthetic cells that have been shown to be nearly as effective as mice cells.

Co-corresponding study author and associate professor of medical science and engineering Diane Hoffman-Kim said this would allow stem cell therapies to advance by eliminating the risk of contamination. 

“The gold standard for making the best stem cells would be starting with embryonic stem cells and growing them on a mouse embryonic fibroblast layer,” Hoffman-Kim said. “If we could understand the elements of that gold standard, then we could try to make an off-the-shelf product.”

Leading the research is Hoffman-Kim’s doctoral student, Christina Lopez-Fagundo.

Researchers also indicate there is still more research that needs to be carried out before the production of stem cells can be a realized part of clinical treatments. 

Members of the research team include associate professor of medical science and engineering Eric Darling, senior research assistant Liane Livi, and former graduate student Talisha Ramchal.

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Brown University 75 Waterman St Providence, RI - 02912

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